Highway 61 Revisited - Bob Dylan

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Year of Release: 1965
Label: Columbia Records
Genre: Folk Rock/Rock/Blues Rock
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Bob Dylan

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Michael Bloomfield



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Frank Owens


Vital Statistics

This album reached at #3 on the Billboard 200 and in the UK top 75 at #4. Highway 61 Revisited stayed on the Billboard for 9 week. This is said to be one of Dylan's greatest albums ever made and it was able to become platinum meaning it sold 1 million copies of the album. This album also contained Dylan's most sold single "Like a Rolling Stone" which reached on to the US charts for 12 weeks at #2. In the UK top 75 it was at #4. Highway 61 Revisited had received multiple accolades for having an outstanding sound and great music.

Background

Bob Dylan was born with the full name Robert Allen Zimmerman and was born in Duluth, Minnesota. He originally grew up listening to Blues and Country type of music on the radio. From that he got the inspiration to start to form his own little bands in high school. After he started to play around with Rock and Roll he fell in love with it so he handed in his electric guitar and got an acoustic guitar. When he got to college he actually dropped out of it and played in a number of shows on the folk music curcuit before he moved to New York City in 1961.

Technical Details

Involved in this album is a number of instruments that were played by Dylan and the band that he brought together for this album. Dylan had played multiple instruments at once like the acoustic guitar and the harmonica. He also played the piano along with his band with a lead guitarists playing an electric guitar. In addition was a pianist, drums and organ players. The single "Like a rolling Stone" was released on an EP and was separate from the album in which it was placed on. The overall theme of this album was the feeling of alienation. Dylan had felt that the title of the album Highway 61 Revisited is going back to when a bunch of people have been either killed or grown up which has the feeling of separation.

Cultural Analysis

The sound of Dylan's music was more like the 60's because during the 60's the music sounded like the singers were talking more but with rhythm and a good tune. The instruments that are used like electric guitar is used a lot during the 60's and is popular around this time period. Dylan mentions a couple of famous icons in his songs like the Rolling Stones in his number 1 single "Like a rolling Stone" and he mentions of course Highway 61 in the song "Highway 61 revisited". Dylan had thought that Highway 61 was a highway that was full of freedom and movement and that is where you should go if you ever need a place to be free and feel free. Bob's biggest idols that he looked up to and followed were Elvis Presley, Woodie Guthrie, Leadbelly, and Chuck Berry. There styles of music definitely had an impact on Dylan's style of music and how he shows it in his lyrics. Not only did Dylan get inspired by other people, he inspired people himself like "The Beatles". A controversy that has come up a few time concerning Dylan was his electric guitar playing at a Newport fold Festival. This was big because while Bob was playing electric guitar the crowd of audience was less enthusiastic than they normally were and that was a big thing to a lot of people. The people were just used to an acoustic sound than an electric sound coming from him.

Music

First side:
1."Like a Rolling Stone"-6:09
2."Tombstone Blues"-5:58
3."It Takes a lot to Laugh, It takes a Train to Cry"-4:09
4."From a Buick 6"-3:19
5."Ballad of a Thin Man"-5:58

Second side:
6."Queen Jane Approximately"-5:31
7."Highway 61 Revisited"-3:30
8."Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues"-5:31
9."Desolation Row"-11:21



Media

Highway 61 Revisited


From a Buick 6

Like a Rolling Stone- Bob Dylan


Refrences
www.wumb.org/programs/Highway61.php

www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=4905


www.wumb.org/programs/Highway61.php

www.dennismerrittjungiananalyst.com/Dylan.htm